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Redd School Blog
Apr
24
//Posted by Redd School

     by:  Ellen LeBlanc 


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Apr
17
//Posted by Redd School

by:  Kendal Crow, Grade 4 teacher

      As a parent and teacher, I have the privilege of living on both sides of the coin.  Teachers incorporate study skills and test taking strategies into lessons daily, but I wanted to figure out a way to practice these skills and strategies at home without my child detecting the smell of extra homework. 

      I’ve figured out how to sneak various undetectable, pureed vegetables  in main dishes and baked goods; however, undetected extra learning, specifically in the area of test strategies had me stumped.  I wanted to come up with a fun activity that would reiterate reading carefully, making sure to read ALL the print, following directions, checking answers for clarity and accuracy, reading instructions or questions before solving the problem, paying attention to details and always doing one’s best.  Then . . . . I had a lightbulb moment.  COOKING!!

       I implore parents to try this as testing draws near.  Allow your child to give you a hand in the kitchen.  Cooking will not only provide extra practice in learning strategies and concepts, but the family time will enjoy awesome bonding and memory making.

      As you engage in cooking with your child, ask him/her to read the recipe instructions to you.  Talk about what would happen if you left an ingredient out.  After you have first gathered your ingredients, model re-reading the ingredient list in order to check for anything overlooked.  Ask your child why they think reading ALL the directions FIRST, rather than acting on the process, is important.  Missing steps like preheating could make things take longer or not turn out correctly.  Continue by pointing out easily overlooked information in fine print or at the end of the container, like high altitude instructions, for example.

      Lastly, take an opportunity for your child to practice using all those fractions and measurements while discussing the importance of precision and accuracy in math.  What will happen if measurements and temperature are not correct?  What will happen if we do not follow the sequence of the instructions?

      Any activity requiring reading and revisiting instructions will help your child practice essential academic skills.  Dads may even want to jump in the fun by building a model with your child,  or fixing something.  As you interact together, following  instructions sequentially and talking about possible outcomes, as well as rechecking for mistakes, you are reinforcing critical study skills and test skills which segue into everyday life skills.

      Most importantly, have fun spending time with your child as you relish another opportunity to pass on your wisdom and experience.

 

 

 

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Apr
02
//Posted by Redd School

by:  Ellen LeBlanc    
I think that someone should print a bumper sticker that says, “Old campers never die; they just become adults who can’t stop talking about their summer camp experiences.”  Perhaps that’s a little long for a bumper sticker, but the point is that a summer camp, if done well, can create some of the best childhood memories.  Silly counselor antics, fabulous activities, enriching experiences, new friends and the absolute promise of fun are things that I remember from my camp experiences.  


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Mar
25
//Posted by Redd School

Kendal Crow, Grade 4 Teacher

As the spring season decorates our world with beautiful blooms, our sinuses are struggling with the not so pleasant pollen.  Combined with the fact that school is in full swing AND we are giving The Stanford Achievement Test soon, it is an excellent time to rev up our immune system and eat some brain boosting foods!  Eating nutrient dense foods will help your child avoid sickness, as well as enhance overall academic performance.  Let’s take a look at the “CREAM OF THE CROPS!” 


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Dec
17
//Posted by Redd School

by:  Ellen LeBlanc
When I walked into school this morning, my first inclination was to hug every child and every teacher.  As parents of Redd School students, you know how I feel about each and every child here.  The teachers feel the same and have bonded with your children in ways I haven’t.  


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Nov
16
//Posted by Redd School

Written by:  Ellen LeBlanc
I was sitting in a restaurant with my husband just the other night.  We’d  made our selections, given our order to the waiter and started talking about our day.  At some point during the conversation I realized that although all the tables in our little section of the restaurant were taken, we were the only ones talking.  I looked around and saw families.  Children were coloring on their placemats and parents were on their phones, either talking or texting or who knows what.  No one seemed unhappy, but no one seemed happy either. 


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Oct
01
//Posted by Redd School

Written by:  Ellen LeBlanc
No matter who I ask, everyone has an opinion about homework.  It’s either too easy, not enough, too much or no one in the entire household understood the instructions.  I’m a parent.  I’ve been in each one of these situations, so I know all the opinions are valid and may change, depending on the day.  But what’s the answer?  Here are some thoughts. 


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Sep
17
//Posted by Redd School

Written By: Ellen LeBlanc
Each Spring, usually at the  end of April or the beginning of May, Redd School gives the Stanford Achievement Test (SAT) to students in Grades 1-8.  The SAT is a norm referenced test, meaning that your child’s test results are compared to his/her peers who took the same test and the data is based on those comparisons.  The results come in over the summer and we order a school copy which we keep in your child’s Permanent Record File and a parent’s copy which is kept in the office for you to pick up at your convenience. 


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Sep
05
//Posted by Redd School

Written by:  Ellen LeBlanc
The older I get, the more questions I have.  I'm hoping someone can help me with this one.  What happens to the things that children and teachers put in backpacks?  I have wondered about this for years and over time I've cultivated some thoughts.  I think that, perhaps, a child's backpack has the same mysterious characteristics as the Bermuda Triangle.  Many scientists believe that the reason planes and ships have disappeared between Virginia, The Bahamas and Bermuda is because of hurricanes and tornadoes that occur in the area.  Others believe it's an unexplainable occurrence.  After all, there are never any remnants, and black boxes or ships logs are never found.  It leaves a lot to the imagination.  Is it a legend or is there some truth?  I have no idea about that, but I do know something about backpacks. 


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Jul
28
//Posted by Redd School

To achieve excellence one must be focused, determined and disciplined. This applies to all aspects of life, especially when it comes to education. Our rich history of academic excellence was not built overnight; it began in 1969 and has thrived through our unwavering commitment. The Redd School was founded on a genuine passion for educational advancement in all possible aspects. We approach every day as a new opportunity to educate the youth and impact the world’s future leaders.  


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4820 Strack Road   |   Houston, Texas 77069   |   281-440-1106
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