Home  |   Events  |  Blog  |  Calendar  |  APPLY  |  contact us
Redd School Blog
Apr
24
//Posted by Redd School

  


Bookmark and Share
Apr
20
//Posted by Redd School

A positive sense of self is one of the most important lessons you can give your child. Children with confidence feel competent are more likely to do well in school and grow into happy, productive people. It’s an essential factor for all aspects of a child’s healthy development. Here's how you can help build your child’s self-confidence to prepare them for the future.

Empower them with choices

Presenting children with choices is a great opportunity for them to use their voices, feel empowered and gain confidence in their own good judgement. This is a big step in growing up and making good choices is a skill that children will use for the rest of their lives. Any easy way to start is giving the choice between two things. For example, at lunch you could offer your child the option of a turkey sandwich or peanut butter and jelly. A key rule to remember is to give only choices that you as a parent can agree to.

Give genuine praise

Kids measure their worth and achievements by what their parents think of them and consider praise a reward in itself. Use words that reflect their age and experience and show understanding. It’s important to be realistic in your praise. Remember that if a child fails at something or shows no talent at a particular skill, you don’t want to unrealistically praise the results. Instead, let them fail and tell them that it is okay not to be able to do everything perfectly. If you praise too much, you will lose credibility. Avoid phrases like "you're the best" or "you're the smartest."

Teach resilience

Ever heard of the little train that could? Teach your child that overcoming challenges are a part of life and that no one succeeds at everything. Like any skill you want your kids to have, you need to demonstrate it in your own life. If your child watches you give up on something because it is too hard, they’ll be more likely to share that attitude. It is important to show them that it is possible to recover and grow from failure.

At Redd School, we believe enabling kids to build on their weaknesses by using their strengths. To learn more about our teaching philosophy, click here.

 


Bookmark and Share
Apr
13
//Posted by Redd School

The things we learn at a young age stays with us forever. Some of our earliest lessons can affect how we interact with the world around us and how we move about life. This is why social skills are very much so a learned behavior and are just as important as language arts, social studies or mathematics. It’s important to remember that social skills are a learned behavior that must be taught to be fully-understood.

Here are 5 social skills that every child should learn and know.

Asking Questions

Questions are the key component to a good conversation. It’s about sharing information while also paying attention and listening. Many kids get so carried away in telling a story they forget that a conversation is a two-way street. A lot of thought can go into asking the right questions for the situation. A good way to practice this is to conduct a mock interview to demonstrate the importance of focusing on others.

Kindly Disagreeing

There will be times when your child disagrees with you, with their teacher, with parents or especially other children. Make sure they know how to do so appropriately to avoid coming across as rude or argumentative. If not handled well, a disagreement that started as a good intention can quickly lead to a fight.

Verbal Appreciation

Educate your child to appreciate the important stuff, small or large. They won’t know to appreciate what they have and understand there are others less fortunate than they are without being taught. Go beyond saying please and thank you to make your child understand WHY they say these things.

Accepting Criticism

Even as adults we have a hard time handling criticism as we often see it as embarrassing or degrading. It is important to teach your child at a young age that criticism is a form of help that will show them how to grow and improve. Remind them that not all criticism is accurate, but how to consider to someone else’s point of view.

Controlling Emotions

As important as it is for children to be in tune with their emotions — random crying, whining and screaming aren’t something kids can grow up doing. Teaching your child to control their emotions will help them with their behavior in the long run. They will understand when it’s okay to cry and how to handle anger.

At Redd School, we believe in educating the whole child. To learn more about our teaching philosophy, click to read more.

 


Bookmark and Share
Apr
04
//Posted by Redd School

  


Bookmark and Share
Mar
29
//Posted by Redd School

Play may be more important than many parents realize. Researchers and educators across the world have found that play can help enrich learning and develop key skills such as creativity, critical thinking, experimentation, and social skills. Ultimately, play is the key to learning!

Play Leads to Discovery

Have you ever watched your child explore and discover things about the world around them? During this time, they are developing a deeper understanding for the physics and mathematical principals of the earth. This type of play is also known as constructive cognition. It’s when they find out how something works on their own. Children are active participants in their own learning, it’s something they do naturally as they interact with surroundings.

Play Involves Math & Science

As children continue to observe, sort, measure, inspect and handle objects — they are developing basic science and math skills. In a recent study, LEGO performance during the preschool years positively predicted performance on standardized tests in 7th grade as well as a number of higher level math classes taken and grades in those classes in middle and high school.

Play Teaches Social Skills

We’ve all seen children gather together to participate in a game or make up a pretend scenario. This situation is the best opportunity for children to learn social skills and practice self-regulation. Working together towards a common goal with other children is how they learn skills such as sharing, problem solving, conflict resolution and mutual respect.

When you are struggling to get an idea or lesson through to your child, try being playful. It’s a great way to gain cooperation and make things fun. Keep in mind that we often need to take a step back and let them do as much as they can on their own as well. This helps ensure they are experiencing first-hand the joys of discovery and lifelong learning.

Click to learn about how we incorporate play in the classroom to foster positive learning environments!


 


Bookmark and Share
Mar
22
//Posted by Redd School

We've all been there. Trying to encourage your child to study can have it's challenges.  


Bookmark and Share
Mar
14
//Posted by Redd School

  


Bookmark and Share
Mar
07
//Posted by Redd School

If you are working at home with your kids in improving learning math and reading skills, why not also help teach them critical-thinking skills? Here are 5 great tips for teaching kids to be critical thinkers, adapted from Mentoring Minds’ Critical Thinking Strategies Guide.

Ask questions

Put a new spin on bell ringers by asking a Question of the Day. Use a questioning stem (e.g., create a riddle that uses the mathematics term “multiply” in one of the clues or write a letter to a classmate recommending this book) and put it on the board. Students can write answers in their critical-thinking journals. Then have a class discussion at the end of the day.

Make a response box

Write a random critical-thinking question on the board, (e.g., Is there a better way to work out this problem? Explain your thinking.). Give students a specified amount of time to provide a written response and put it in the response box. Pull out entries one by one and read them aloud to the class. Alternatively, you can give a prize—like a homework pass or free time—to the student with the first appropriate response whose name is drawn from the box or to everyone who submitted appropriate answers.

Role-play

Come up with an imaginary scenario and have kids work through the steps to solve a problem as a class. First, identify the problem and write it as a question (e.g., Why didn’t the science experiment work as planned?). Then brainstorm ideas to solve it and choose the best one to write as a solution statement. Finally, create an action plan to carry out the solution.

Turn around thinking 

A great way to focus on the positive in not-so-positive situations is the Turn Around thinking strategy. If a student forgets to bring his homework to school, you can ask, “What good can come of this?” The student can answer with ideas like, “I will change my routine before I go to bed.”

Ask “why?” five times

When you encounter a problem in class, you can help the class come up with a solution by using the Why? Five Times strategy. Ask the first why question (e.g., Why didn’t the class do well on the spelling test?), and after a response is given, ask why four more times (e.g., Why didn’t students study for the test?, Why didn’t students have time to study for the test?, etc.). The idea is that after the fifth question is asked, the problem will be solved.

At Redd School, our goal is to take your child from where they are academically, emotionally and socially to as far as they can go. Learn more about our academic philosophy. 
  


Bookmark and Share
Feb
27
//Posted by Redd School

Bookmark and Share
Feb
20
//Posted by Redd School

Bookmark and Share
4820 Strack Road   |   Houston, Texas 77069   |   281-440-1106
Site Developed by TAG Studios